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Famous Last Words


We have no idea when we will die and what the last words from our mouths will be. That's one reason that I often tell the people that I love, "I love you." That may be the last thing they will ever hear me say. That's one way in which I would like to be remembered.

My dad died at the young age of 42. Shortly before my last visit to my parents' home before Dad's death, I had broken up with a young lady named Becka. The last thing I remember my dad saying during that weekend visit was, "You know I have never commented on any of the girls you have dated, but I think breaking up with Becka was a mistake." How right he was! I wish he knew how precious his last words have been to me through the years. Becka and I eventually got back together after my father had passed away. I know he would have blessed our marriage if he had lived to see it.

I recently received a list of funny famous last words that someone has probably uttered ... or could have uttered, depending on the circumstances. With that list in mind, I did some searching to find the last words of some well-known people. Some of their last words were prophetic and some were ironic and humorous. After these real last words, I'll share the list of funny ones you could almost hear someone saying.

"A dying man can do nothing easy." — Benjamin Franklin, statesman, April 17, 1790

"It is well, I die hard, but I am not afraid to go." — George Washington, first US President, December 14, 1799

"Is it the Fourth?" — Thomas Jefferson, US President, July 4, 1826

"Thomas Jefferson ... still survives...." — John Adams, US President, July 4, 1826 (Actually, Mr. Adams didn't know Jeffereson had died earlier that same day.)

"Lord help my poor soul." — Edgar Allan Poe, writer, October 7, 1849

"They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance." — General John Sedgwick, Union Commander, uttered right before he was shot, May 9, 1864
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It’s About Time


picture of springing forward

This next weekend is on my extremely short list of my least favorite weekends of the year. Why? We will be switching to Daylight Savings Time. It seems as though losing an hour happens when I'm tired enough already. Oh well, we'll get that hour back in November, right? :-) I'm going to confess something to you in this public forum and I beg you not to turn me in to the authorities — I do not get up in the middle of the night to change my clocks. (Gasp!) For a day or two afterwards, I keep finding clocks that I didn't think of on various appliances, etc. I basically loathe the whole process.

Time has been on my mind lately already as I try to grasp the reality that our grandson Drew is turning four this Wednesday. My long-time readers will probably find that as hard to believe as we do! It doesn't seem like four years since he was born six and a half weeks early. Our second grandchild is due in about a month, and at least for Grandma and Poppie, the time has just flown since we first heard the news. (Although it may not have seemed that way for Mark and Katie, especially for Katie....) The same is true of how fast Nora and Topher's wedding is coming up — in less than four weeks!

Today's blog post is a mixture of cartoons and jokes about time,.

Many people have a fairly fluid sense of time, as seen in the following chat exchange.

picture of a chat

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More Senior Texting Code


Back in mid-December I did a blog post called Texting for Seniors. Since more and more seniors are texting and tweeting, there appears to be a need for STC (Seniors' Texting Code) — things that go beyond TTYL (talk to you later) and BTW (by the way). STC would be helpful to communicate things that seniors citizens say frequently and would want to include in a text message to their senior peeps. If you qualify for Senior Discounts and do texting, this is the code for you!

Senior Texting Code

AFT: Another Funeral Today

ATD: At the Doctor's

B2N: Bingo Tonight?

BNMD: Back In My Day

CBM: Covered By Medicare
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Random Finds


As I receive funny pictures by e-mail or stumble upon them as I surf, I save them to a file. As I looked at the contents of that file this weekend, I saw some great humor, but nothing following any particular theme. So I decided to do a post of some of those random finds.

This little monkey must have slipped trying to climb up for one of those bananas.

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No matter how you feel about using animals for testing, I think you'll enjoy this next picture.
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Yankee-Dixie Quiz


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Yesterday's blog post on the various regional names for carbonated beverages evoked quite a few fun comments. While people still have regionalisms fresh on their minds, I thought I'd post a link to an online quiz called Are You a Yankee or a Rebel? It takes very little time to answer the twenty questions, click on Compute my score, and find out how much of one or the other you are. Some of the questions are about pronunciations and others about word choices. My results were 36% Dixie. You are definitely a Yankee, which I think is fairly accurate since I'm sure I have picked up some regionalisms here in South Carolina. Becka's results were 46% Dixie. Barely in Yankeedom. We grew up in the same town in Ohio — on the same street, in fact! So really we've lived most of our lives in the same places — Ohio, Michigan, and South Carolina. Maybe her Dixie factor was higher because she has lived in South Carolina 3 years longer than I, while I was teaching in Michigan when we were single. But we're both to the point now where we've lived about half of our lives in the South.

I hope many of you will take the quiz, and then come back here to post your results. It will be interesting to see how accurate the quiz is for my readers. There were several questions where I had to stop to decide which word probably comes to my mind first since through prolonged exposure I'm comfortable using either one.

If you're really interested in this sort of thing, I found an extremely extensive site — http://aschmann.net/AmEng

=^..^= =^..^=
Rob

Always remember that you're unique, just like everyone else.