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Planning


Sometimes we're good at planning and sometimes we're not. Sometimes we make great plans and find that, as has been adapted from the poet Robert Burns, "The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry." And sometimes we're not good planners. I've received several things lately that highlight good and poor planning. Then I added a favorite "classic" that illustrates some disastrous results of poor planning.

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Dan was a single guy living at home with his father and working in the family business. When he found out he was going to inherit a fortune when his sickly father died, he decided he needed a wife with whom to share his fortune.

One evening at an investment meeting he spotted the most beautiful woman he had ever seen. Her natural beauty took his breath away.

"I may look like just an ordinary man," he said to her, "but in just a few years, my father will die, and I'll inherit 20 million dollars."

Impressed, the woman obtained his business card and three days later, she became his stepmother.

Women are so much better at estate planning than men.

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I received this from someone who grew up in Canada and now is a US citizen...

As a country Canada has been much influenced historically by three nations - France, England, and America, and Canadians aren't quite sure of their identity. So they try to have a flavor from all three, but they have made horrible choices.

The story goes like this ... Canadians could have had French cuisine, English culture and American technology but instead chose English food, French technology and American culture.

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Dear Sir:

I am writing in response to your request for additional information in Block #3 of the accident reporting form. I put "poor planning" as the cause of my accident. You said in your letter that I should explain more fully and I trust that the following details will be sufficient.

I am a bricklayer by trade. On the day of the accident, I was working alone on the roof of a new six-story building. When I completed my work, I discovered that I had about 500 pounds of bricks left over. Rather than carry the bricks down by hand, I decided to lower them in a barrel by using a pulley, which, fortunately, was attached to the side of the building at the sixth floor.

Securing the rope at ground level, I went up to the roof, swung the barrel out and loaded the bricks into it. Then I went back to the ground and untied the rope, holding it tightly to ensure a slow descent of the 500 pounds of bricks. You will note in Block #11 of the accident reporting form that my weight is 135 pounds.

Due to my surprise at being jerked off the ground so suddenly, I lost my presence of mind and forgot to let go of the rope. Needless to say, I proceeded at a rather rapid rate up the side of the building. In the vicinity of the third floor, I met the barrel which was now proceeding in a downward direction at an equally impressive rate of speed. This explains the fractured skull, minor abrasions, and the broken collarbone, as listed in Section III of the accident reporting form.

Slowed only slightly, I continued my rapid ascent, not stopping until the fingers of my right hand were 2 knuckles deep into the pulley, which I mentioned in paragraph #2 of this correspondence. Fortunately, by this time, I had regained my presence of mind and was able to hold tightly to the rope, in spite of the excruciating pain I was now beginning to experience.

At approximately the same time, however, the barrel of bricks hit the ground--and the bottom fell out of the barrel. Devoid of the weight of the bricks, the barrel now weighed approximately 50 pounds. I refer you again to MY weight in Block #11. As you might imagine, I began a rapid descent down the side of the building. In the vicinity of the third floor, I met the barrel coming up. This accounts for the two fractured ankles, broken tooth, and the severe lacerations of my legs and lower body.

Here my luck began to change slightly. The encounter with the barrel seemed to slow me enough to lessen my injuries when I fell into the pile of bricks and fortunately, only 3 vertebrae were cracked. I am sorry to report, however, that as I lay there on the pile of bricks in pain, unable to move and watching the empty barrel six stories above me, I again lost my composure and presence of mind and let go of the rope.

Policy # xyz1234567890

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I haven't posted any pictures of our grandson Drew for a while, so here are several that Grandma and I like.

Drew in his Exersaucer...

Our little "basket case"...

quotation...

"God always sees the individual and the inside and deals with each of us accordingly." - Dr. Tim Jordan

=^..^= =^..^=
Rob

Plan to be spontaneous tomorrow.


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4 Comments on “Planning”

  1. #1 B.J.
    on Jan 31st, 2008 at 1:20 pm

    That picture of Drew in his exersaucer proves that Calvin (from Calvin & Hobbes) has NOTHING on this kid!

  2. #2 Carrie
    on Jan 31st, 2008 at 2:41 pm

    This story never ceases to amuse and horrify me. Your little Drew is one adorable baby. :o)

  3. #3 Amanda
    on Jan 31st, 2008 at 9:35 pm

    Drew is absolutely adorable. ^_^ I also think he looks like you. (No, I’m not looking for bonus points, I really think that!) Thanks for posting the pictures. I’ve been terrribly baby-deprived here.

  4. #4 Jessica
    on Feb 2nd, 2008 at 1:03 am

    He’s so cute!!! =)


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