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Posts Tagged ‘economy’

Do You Have Economic Concerns?


One of the strange things about blogging is that I post things for others to read, and they learn a lot about my life. Yet I don't actually know many (most?) of my readers personally at all. Consequently, I do not know the various situations in which my readers find themselves. I know that there must be some who are unemployed, underemployed, or in some other way struggling financially. We know many people very well who have faced and are facing great financial distress because of the economy at large. So as I post today's humor about economic issues, I am in no way trying to imply that the tough times you might be facing are a laughing matter. Keeping a sense of humor in the face of such things is often a healthy way of coping.

I'll start off with an exchange of letters between an employee and his boss.

One day an employee sent a letter to his boss, subtly asking for an increase in his salary:

Dear Bo$$,

In thi$ life, we all need $omething mo$t de$perately. I think you $hould be under$tanding of the need$ of u$ worker$ who have given $o much $upport, including $weat and $ervice, to your company. I am $ure you will gue$$ what I mean and re$pond $oon.

Your$ $incerely,

Norman $mith

The next day, the employee received the following reply:
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Do You Understand Economists?


picture of magazine cover

Do you understand the "economy?" Or better yet, do you understand economists? In two earlier posts, I shared that I have a good grasp on personal finances, but maybe not so much on how the economy works, particularly the global economy. It's even more confusing to listen to the experts (economists) talk about it. They make what seems like good news sound dreary and what seems like bad news sound as though things are improving.

In my files I ran across some humor about economists and the economy. If we can't understand what economists are saying about a complicated field, at least we can enjoy a laugh or two at their expense.

A mathematician, an accountant, and an economist apply for the same job. The interviewer calls in the mathematician and asks, "What do two plus two equal?" The mathemetician replies, "Four." The interviewer asks, "Four, exactly?" The mathematician looks at the interviewer incredulously and says, "Yes, four, exactly."

Then the interviewer calls in the accountant and asks the same question, "What do two plus two equal?" The accountant says, "On average, four — give or take ten percent, but on average, four."

Then the interviewer calls in the economist and poses the same question, "What do two plus two equal?" The economist gets up, locks the door, closes the shade, sits down next to the interviewer and says, "What do you want it to equal?"
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Please, Help Me Understand Economics!


picture of world economics

This past week, in an assembly of all the university students and faculty, an administrator explained changes forthcoming in the basic core courses that all of our students must take at BJU. One of the new courses that will be required for graduation is Foundations of Economics. With all the difficulties people in today's world are having with debt, this should be a great course to give our young people information that could help them avoid personal financial disaster.

I find the world's economy far more mystifying than personal finances. The following picture from despair.com almost makes sense to me.

picture of funny picture

Today I'm posting some cartoons, informative pictures, and funny pictures on the subject of economics and the economy.
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What’s a Billion?


picture comparing numbers
It's hard enough for me to get my mind around one million, but to try to understand the concepts of a billion or a trillion is beyond my finite mind. (You math teachers out there, please be patient with me and thank the Lord that He wanted me to be a French professor instead!)

A million is a hard concept to grasp. Did you know that a stack of a million one dollar bills is about 358 feet tall?! I read somewhere that for a person to count out loud from 1 to 1,000,000 it would take 23 days, counting day and night, without breakfast, lunch or dinner, without sleep, television, a phone call or a bathroom break!

Here are several more concrete comparisons of a million, a billion, and a trillion:

A million seconds is 12 days.
A billion seconds is 31 years.
A trillion seconds is 31,688 years.

A million minutes ago was 1 year, 329 days, 10 hours and 40 minutes ago
A billion minutes ago it was the year 107 AD.
A trillion minutes ago was over 1,900,000 years ago!

[added the evening of October 2 - for a really clear comparison of a million and a billion, take a look at Andrew's comment to this post]

Between World War I and World War II, Germans had to deal with astronomic numbers daily because inflation was so high and their currency was so devalued. It cost 200 billion Marks to buy one loaf of bread! Imagine having to deal with numbers like that! You can read a very good article about it by clicking here. Here's a picture of a German one billion Mark bill from 1923:

Whatever you want to say

Evolutionists throw the words million and billion around pretty freely. Here's a story I love that highlights that:

Tourists in the Chicago Museum of Natural History were amazed at the dinosaur bones. One of them asked the guard, "Can you tell me how old the dinosaur bones are?"

The guard replied, "They are three million four years and six months old."

"That's an awfully exact number," said the tourist. "How do you know their age so precisely?"

The guard answered, "Well, I was told that the dinosaur bones were three million years old when I started working here, and that was four and a half years ago."

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Lately politicians are throwing the word billion around like it's chump change. The following article is from the website of one of our local TV stations WYFF 4:

If the $700 billion price tag attached to the bailout plan that failed sounds like a lot, well, it is.

You can spend $700 billion in a lot of different ways. For instance, you could buy a war — the U.S. has spent $648 billion on the war in Iraq so far.

That much money could ensure universal health care coverage for six years or upgrade the country's most deficient bridges four times over. Or you could build 1,750 bridges to nowhere. Surely all of those would eventually take you somewhere.

With $700 billion you could easily run Denmark, which had a paltry gross domestic product of $312 billion last year.

That much money could also pay back every single outstanding student loan, fund the national intelligence budget beyond 2020, or help the Gulf Coast recover from five Hurricane Katrinas.

The next time you hear a politician use the word billion in a glib, casual manner, you might want to think about how wisely politicians are spending your tax money. I guess if you can be glib about a billion, what's a measly $700 billion bailout?! It's just 700 of those billion-thingies....

Several people have expressed their thoughts about the bailout in their comments to my post the blame game. I'd be interested in reading what my readers think about the prospect of our government bailing out these failing businesses.

quotation...

"The certainty that Messiah reigns produces calm in the face of current affairs, patience with the events of one's own life, satisfaction with the Lord's management of all things, expectancy that a glorious future is coming, and confidence in the One who sits upon the throne." - Walter Chantry

=^..^= =^..^=
Rob

"The god of the 'American Dream' doesn't seem to be coming through right now." - Dr. Drew Conley


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