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Posts Tagged ‘French’

Caught Up in the World of French Literature


I have heard from various readers that they have missed my blog posts. I just want to let you know that it's not because I haven't been writing. What I've been doing is adapting French literature for my students. It's a project that started a year ago.

Now that my MLF 202 students have gone through my adaptations, I felt ready to make them available for other French classes. So I am excited to tell you they are now published on Amazon!

The pictures of the books below are linked to the pages on Amazon:
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Tongue Twisters


Being a language teacher, I enjoy having fun with language. Recently in one of my classes, something came up about tongue twisters. I thought I'd post a few of my favorites today in English, and then for those who are interested in several fun ones in French and German.

(These are the most fun when you try to pronounce them out loud, saying the shorter ones several times.)

Mr. See owned a saw. And Mr. Soar owned a seesaw. Now, See's saw sawed Soar's seesaw before Soar saw See, which made Soar sore. Had Soar seen See's saw before See sawed Soar's seesaw, See's saw would not have sawed Soar's seesaw. So See's saw sawed Soar's seesaw. But it was sad to see Soar so sore just because See's saw sawed Soar's seesaw.

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
Did Peter Piper pick a peck of pickled peppers?
If Peter Piper Picked a peck of pickled peppers,
Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?

Which wristwatches are Swiss wristwatches?

Unique New York

Toy Boat

divider

Now let's try a some in French where tongue twisters are called des virelangues = tongue turners. I will translate them into English.
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Random Humor


My readers and students send me some of the funniest stuff, knowing what my sense of humor is like. One of the problems is that so many things wouldn't fit into any one topic for a blog post. So the topic of this one is randomness to allow me to share some of the great things I've received lately.

This basketball player must have been forewarned, because now he's four-armed.

Forewarned Is Four-Armed

I've been told that the Wizard of Oz is only of the most universally recognizable pieces of Americana. During my 40 years of teaching, I have had drop many bits of humor from my repertoire because my students no longer recognized them, and the time required to explain the humor was simply not profitable. I can attest that most of my American students still respond to some of the most oblique references to the Wizard of Oz. Here's some humor about the movie most of Americans will get ... I think....
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Rock, Paper, Scissors


Have you ever played Rock, Paper, Scissors? It's a simple game, but I've read that there is actually strategy involved in winning. The game consists of three gestures (weapons) — rock, represented by a clenched fist, paper, represented by an open hand, with the fingers extended and touching, and scissors, represented by two fingers extended and separated.

The object of the game is to select a gesture that defeats the opponent's. The winning gestures are as follows:

Rock smashes scissors = the rock wins.
Paper covers rock = the paper wins.
Scissors cut paper = the scissors win.

If both players use the same gesture, that round is tied and the players "throw" again. Normally Rock, Paper, Scissors is played in a "best two out of three" match.

As I did some research for this post, I was surprised to learn that there is a World RPS Society website. As I said earlier, there are supposedly strategies to help you win. On the World RPS Society website there's a link on How to Beat Anyone at Rock, Paper, Scissors.

Knowing that RPS is an international phenomenon, I figured it must have a name in other languages. I found that in French it's Pierre, Papier, Ciseaux and in German it's Stein, Papier, Schere.

In case this game is new to you, I'll show several pictures to see if you remember which gesture wins.

The picture below is rock and scissors. So who wins this round?

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Funny French Signs


I love funny signs, and I know that many of my readers enjoy them also. At the beginning of my 38th year (!) of teaching French, I decided to share some French humor. I'll try to do it in a way that all can enjoy, even if they've never studied French.

In a post called Unhelpful Road Signs I poked fun at the following combination of signs:

picture of French sign

I still miss the logic of one sign's saying Toutes Directions, indicating all directions, right next to another sign saying other directions. If all means all, how can there be other?! And yet you see that pairing of signs all over France!

This next pairing is even more illogical.
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