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The Pringles Food Pyramid

picture of food pyramid [1]

Many people are careful about what they eat, striving to eat a balanced diet each day. When my dear wife Becka used to teach nutrition, she covered the USDA's Food Pyramid with her students. If you click on the thumbnail picture of the food pyramid on the right, you can see a larger version of it. If you would like to read more about it, you can go to the official USDA site [2] or to another site [3] that has several optional food pyramids.

You may be wondering what all that has to do with Pringles [4]. Let me explain. Our grandson Drew, who just turned 3 on March 9 [5], loves Pringles. I've never been crazy about Pringles, especially if "real potato chips" were available. (My wife and I grew up on Ballreich potato chips [6] in northwestern Ohio, and so we judge all other potato chips by them.)

Recently I ran across a picture online that was a little disturbing — three flavors of Pringles that I had a hard time believing really existed. It started me on some online searching whereby I discovered not only that they do indeed exist, but they are among many other surprising flavors of Pringles — I found over 80 in all! This post is much longer than usual, but it's almost entirely pictures that I think you will enjoy looking at.

picture of Pringles original

The Pringles [4] brand of potato crisps was first sold in the United States in October 1968, originally known as "Pringle's Newfangled Potato Chips." Procter & Gamble chose the "Pringles" name from a Cincinnati telephone book, having been inspired by the street name of Pringle Drive, simply due to "its pleasing sound." According to the patent, Pringles were invented by Alexander Liepa of Montgomery, Ohio, and Gene Wolfe developed the machine that cooks them. Other snack manufacturers objected, saying that Pringles failed to meet the definition of a potato "chip" — Pringles have less than 50% potato content. Pringles eventually opted to rename their product "potato crisps" instead of chips. This led to other issues in the United Kingdom, though, where the term "potato crisp" refers to the product that Americans call "potato chips" and where "chips" are French fries. (Complicated, isn't it?)

Below are pictures of the kinds of Pringles I found online.

I'll start off with a flavor that's not too bizarre.

picture of Pringles

Here are a couple more interesting flavors.

picture of Pringles

The next couple of flavors get us into the vegetable area of the food pyramid.

picture of Pringles

This next one is Italian Bruschetta.

picture of Pringles

Here are two fun flavors — Funky Mustard (left) and Mushroom (right).

picture of Pringles

Here are some with different seasonings.

picture of Pringles

Mexican food is much loved. Here a couple of Mexican flavors.

picture of Pringles

Mexican food is often quite hot/spicy. Here are several Pringles flavors in the hot and spicy department.

picture of Pringles

The second from the left (below) is a little hard to read. It's Smokin' Hot Ranch.

picture of Pringles

The last couple are a little extreme to my tastes. You may have noticed from several of those pictures that Pringles has a line of flavors called "Extreme," some of which don't seem all that "extreme" to me.

picture of Pringles

picture of Pringles

Pringles has a product line called Pringles Select. Here are some of the select flavors.

picture of Pringles

One select flavor that seemed unusual to me was Cinnamon Sweet Potato.

picture of Pringles

The Pringles Select line comes in bags rather than the can. The shapes are different too. Below is a picture of the standard saddle-shape of Pringles on the left versus Pringles Select on the right.

picture of Pringles

Pringles also has a product line called "Cravers." Here are some of those:

picture of Pringles

picture of Pringles

Here are two flavors, one Extreme and one Cravers, that are ... interesting.

picture of Pringles

Here are some other flavors I found on one site. The Spring Onion & Feta sounds intriguing to me.

picture of Pringles

You can see that we could get some of our vegetables and dairy from Pringles. Here's one that sounds like a meal in itself.

picture of Pringles

This one is Pringles Sour Cream Bacon, in case you can't read the words on the package.

picture of Pringles

We're definitely moving forward in the dairy department with these flavors:

picture of Pringles

picture of Pringles

"Taco Night" (mentioned earlier in the post) and "Cheeseburger" (the one on the far right in the picture above) were recalled earlier this month as a safety precaution after salmonella was found in a Basic Food Flavors plant which produces the flavor-enhancing hydrolyzed vegetable protein used in those flavors.

Here's a cheese-based flavor that I have a hard time imagining:

picture of Pringles

I guess Mac 'n Cheese fits into both the dairy and the grain categories. Here's another one that fits two categories — dairy and meat. It's Cheese & Bacon.

picture of Pringles

Let's move now into the meat part of the Pringles Food Pyramid. Here are several from an American Street series of Pringles.

picture of Pringles

If you prefer your meat plain, here are several options.

picture of Pringles

picture of Pringles

Consommé would probably fit best into the meat category, because of its flavor.

picture of Pringles

Here are two flavors that sound, um ... different.

picture of Pringles

Here's an extreme meat flavor.

picture of Pringles

Here are several meat flavors I would never have thought of for potato chip flavors. On the left it's Red Chili Chicken, and on the right it's Smoked Salami.

picture of Pringles

Here are several ethnic meats.

picture of Pringles

picture of Pringles

If your tastes tend more towards gourmet foods, Pringles won't let you down.

picture of Pringles

picture of Pringles

Here are the three flavors that got me started on this post in the first place — Pringles Ocean flavors.

picture of Pringles

If those are too tame for your tastes, here's one with a little more zip:

picture of Pringles

If you'll recall, the base of the USDA food pyramid is grains. There are several types of Pringles in the grain category. I've already mentioned Mac 'n Cheese above. Here are a couple of others:

The first one is spaghetti, which would be a pasta, which is a grain, right?

picture of Pringles

The one on the left below is definitely in the grain category. The one on the right has rice, but it's almost a complete meal with the BBQ spare rib thrown in too.

picture of Pringles

Pringles has a new multigrain line — Truly Original, Cheesy Cheddar, Creamy Ranch. Sorry, but the picture below is the only picture I could find of the new line.

picture of Pringles

If you're concerned about the fat content, Pringles has you covered there too. Here are several from their light line.

picture of Pringles

At least they used "less" correctly on the right — 50% Fewer Calories would have been more pleasing to calorie-conscious grammarians.

Pringles is even branching out into some fruit flavors. Avocados are technically fruits, aren't they?

picture of Pringles

Here are several with Lime flavoring.

picture of Pringles

Lay's seems to have Pringles beat so far in fruit-flavored chips.

picture of Pringles

Loading up on Pringles could definitely "put a tiger in your tank."

picture of Pringles

picture of Pringles pyramid

I realize that for most of these, it's just flavorings and not actual food products. Pringles are not going to bring anyone into conformity with the recommendations of the USDA food pyramid, but they definitely try to appeal to a wide range of tastes by offering something that almost anyone might enjoy.

What kind of Pringles did you find the most disturbing in this post? Was there a kind you'd like to try? What's the weirdest kind you've ever tried? Is there a flavor you'd like to see them offer?

quotation...

"The most terrifying words in the English language are: I'm from the government and I'm here to help." - Ronald Reagan

=^..^= =^..^=
Rob

Do hungry crows have ravenous appetites?